About Pack 18

Background

Since 1930, the Boy Scouts of America has helped younger boys through Cub Scouting. It is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in kindergarten through fifth grade (or 7 – 10 years of age). Parents, leaders, and organizations work together to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting. We have provided some basic information here, but you can also visit Scouting.org for more information.

 

Purposes of Cub Scouting

The Cub Scouting program has 10 purposes related to the overall mission of the Boy Scouts of America—to build character, learn citizenship, and develop personal fitness:

Character Development
Spiritual Growth
Good Citizenship
Sportsmanship and Fitness
Family Understanding
Respectful Relationships
Personal Achievement
Friendly Service
Fun and Adventure
Preparation for Boy Scouts

 

How often do we meet?

Groups of 5-10 boys (of the same age/grade level) called Dens generally meet twice a month. The ranks of cub scouting begin with Tiger Scouts (first-graders), then progress to Wolf Cub Scouts (second-graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third-graders), Webelos Scouts (fourth graders) and Arrow of Light (fifth-graders). Den meetings are often held at a scout’s home, or at a school.

Once a month, all of the Dens and family members gather for a Pack meeting at Farragut Elementary School under the direction of the Cubmaster and Pack Committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.  There are other Pack sponsored events and meetings, like the Pinewood Derby, Space Derby and Raingutter Regatta. Our also Pack makes an effort to participate in service projects throughout the year.

 

Who Pays For It?

Groups that support Cub Scouting include the boys and their parents, the Pack and the community. The Pack also obtains income by working on approved money-earning projects like our annual popcorn sales.

Scouting Values

In addition to the fun and excitement of Cub Scout activities, it is Scouting’s mission to instill in each boy the values of the Scout Oath and Law:

Scout Oath

On my honor I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country
and to obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong,
mentally awake, and morally straight.

 

Scout Law

Trustworthy. A Scout tells the truth and keeps his promises. People can depend on him.
Loyal. A Scout is true to his family, friends, Scout leaders, school, and country.
Helpful. A Scout volunteers to help others without expecting a reward.
Friendly. A Scout is a friend to everyone, even people who are very different from him.
Courteous. A Scout is polite to everyone and always uses good manners.
Kind. A Scout treats others as he wants to be treated. He never harms or kills any living thing without good reason.
Obedient. A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and pack. He obeys the laws of his community and country.
Cheerful. A Scout looks for the bright side of life. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.
Thrifty. A Scout works to pay his way. He uses time, property, and natural resources wisely.
Brave. A Scout can face danger even if he is afraid. He stands for what is right even if others laugh at him.
Clean. A Scout keeps his body and mind fit. He helps keep his home and community clean.
Reverent. A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others.
Cub Scout Motto
Do Your Best.

 

Colors

The Cub Scouting colors are blue and gold. They have a special meaning, which will help boys see beyond the fun of Cub Scouting to its ultimate goals:

The BLUE stands for truth and spirituality, steadfast loyalty, and the sky above; and
The GOLD stands for warm sunlight, good cheer, and happiness.

 

What do Pack, Den, Akela, etc., mean?

Click here for the Cub Scout Glossary.

 

Our Activities

 

How can I learn more about Pack 18?

Please visit our Join Pack 18 page, email us at info@cubscoutpack18.org or contact us through the form below: